A Classification of American Wealth
History and genealogy of the wealthy families of America - Sponsors


 Part 1 : Colonial and Mercantile America  Part 2 : America in the Gilded Age
 Part 3 : America in the Twentieth Century  Encyclopedia of American Wealth

Info  FAQ  Site map  Links  Books  Login

american.wealth@raken.com

  Part I-Chapter 2 : Planter  Aristocrats  > The Langhornes  :     Previous   1 - 2 - 3 - 4   Next

Due to the untimely drowning of their father in the James River in 1797, the three sons of Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne received equal portions of both their father and their grandfather's estates. An interesting event occured at this time. Peter Carr, a favorite nephew of Thomas Jefferson wrote a letter to George Washington under the name of his kinsman John Langhorne. The letter was intended to "elicit political sentiments useful to the republican cause in Virginia." However, when it was discovered that John Langhorne had recently died and that the true author of the letter was Peter Carr, George Washington became very suspicious of Thomas Jefferson, as he had assumed that Peter Carr had written the letter under the instructions of Thomas Jefferson. The infamous "Langhorne Letter" was published in 1803.

The eldest of the three brothers and heirs of John Scarsbrook Langhorne's estate was William Langhorne (1783-1858) who moved to Bedford County, where he wed Catherine Callaway, the daughter of the extremely rich planter and iron manufacturer Col. James Callaway of "Royal Forest", whose third wife was Mary Langhorne of Cumberland. William Langhorne was, like his father-in-law, a planter and iron manufacturer, who was said to be the most courtly gentleman of his day. 

The second brother Maurice Langhorne (1787-1865) moved to Lynchburg, where his inherited wealth was fantastically increased by his successful forays in the Lynchburg tobacco market. Before he died, Maurice Langhorne built for his children the famous "Langhorne's Row," a set of four extravagant Greek Revival Lynchburg townhouses, whose architectural sophistication was unmatched anywhere in Virginia with the sole exception of Richmond.

The youngest brother Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne (1790-1854) would surpass them all. Although he was first seated on some of the Cumberland County lands that he had inherited through his mother, he quickly resolved to move to Lynchburg with his brother Maurice. In 1816 Henry S. Langhorne married Frances Callaway Steptoe, the highly sought after daughter of Hon. James Steptoe and Frances Callaway of "Federal Hill". Here begins a series of interesting family connections that beautifully illustrate the "web of kinship" that existed between Virginia's ruling families. Frances Callaway was an older sister of Catherine Callaway, wife of Henry Langhorne's brother William. Hon. James Steptoe was the eldest son of Westmoreland County planter Col. James Steptoe of "Nominy Hall" and his second wife Elizabeth Eskridge of "Sandy Point" (a daughter of Col. George Eskridge, the guardian of Mary Ball Washington). Hon. James Steptoe had two sisters, Elizabeth Steptoe who married Col. Philip Ludwell Lee of "Stratford", and Anne Steptoe who married Samuel Washington and became the mother of George Steptoe Washington who in turn married Lucy Payne, the sister of First Lady Dolly Payne Madison. Hon. James Steptoe also had two half sisters who were his mother's daughters by her first husband William Aylett. The first sister, Mary Aylett, married ThomasLudwell Lee, and the second, Anne Aylett, became the first wife of Richard Henry Lee of "Chantilly".

Planter  Aristocrats  > The Langhornes  :     Previous  1 - 2 - 3 - 4  Next

Patroons and Manor Lords

Planter  Aristocrats

Shipping Merchants

The Landlords of New YorkCity

Bankers I

Early American Industrialists
 

Google
 

Copyright 2000-2011 : D.C.Shouter and RAKEN Services